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Archive for August, 2008

I am writing this from my dining room, as my husband and nephew play Wii boxing in the living room, and my niece and step-nephew listen to music on my niece’s cell phone. Just another Saturday night at our place.

I talked to one of my Nashville friends for several hours today. She and another friend of mine have a PR business together, and they’re going to help me promote my book. I was extremely grateful for her input and expertise. Good friends are hard to find.

One thing has become obvious – if I’m going to get readers, and interviewees, I’m going to have to change my wording. “Mental illness” repels people like a cat and a bathtub. I have to soften what I am saying, which is frustrating to me because part of the reason why I am even writing this is to take the stigma out of it, and get people to realize that all mental illness REALLY means is an illness in the brain, just like diabetes is an illness of the pancreas, and heart disease is a disease of the heart. But not everybody sees things the way I see them, and I really can’t expect them to, so I have to soften my wording.

Really, it’s such a broad category. It can mean depression, bipolar disorder, anxiety, addiction, etc., etc. So when I’m talking about this, I have to be more specific, I guess.

Live and learn. But for now, Saturday, play and enjoy family.

My youngest nephew turned 7 this past week, and his birthday party is tomorrow, so I’m off to find him some Lego goodies at Walmart. I can’t believe how big he’s gotten. He was born 2 weeks before 9-11. I remember going to see him in the hospital. When he was a toddler, I was his nanny for 4 months. I have been head-over-heels for the kid since the first time I saw him. My oldest nephew leaves to go into the Navy next year. They really do grow up too fast, you know. Enjoy them while they’re here. I love each and every one of them. They’re beautiful.

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Take the Survey

If you suffer from anxiety, depression, addiction, or any other emotional issues, I want to hear from you.

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Creative Worship

Tonight my good friend Rachael came by for a visit, and she brought with her some collages she had made from construction paper and magazine words and pictures.  She actually had a “collage party” last Friday, though I was not able to go.

Rachael and I share many of the same views and issues.  We struggle with overeating, bouts of depression, and seeing ourselves the way the Lord sees us.  Rach is one of the most creative people I know.  She’s a beautiful singer, a talented artist, and she does drama and dance.  Her testimony is amazing, and all of these things combined have given her a really cool ministry.

As I was looking over the collages, I wondered how I might become a more creative worshiper.  I struggle to worship when I’m alone.   Making and sticking with alone time with God is a challenge in itself.  Rachael’s collages really inspired me, though.  I want to worship more, and more fully.

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Got this from Randomness.
A little behind but still good.

My pet peeves…hmm….in no particular order:

-slow drivers
-tailgaters
-OK any driver but me
-seeing people abusing their kids in public
-people popping by my blog to tell me I’m a moron (thanks for the tip)
_a messy kitchen or bathroom
-gossip
-arrogance
-ignorance

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I’m writing from my favorite recliner, watching the end of the Olympics. I’m kind of sad to see them end. I loved following Michael Phelps. Once again, the United States proved to be the best of the best. It was thrilling to watch. There is someone special at every Olympics, but there was something especially electrifying about Phelps.

Indeed, I think I have a little crush on Mr. Phelps. That, and I love a good success story.

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McCain’s Denver Office Evacuated After Threat

And supposedly another one of his campaign headquarters just received another threatening package.

Yeah, that’ll show ’em.  Just kill the guy if you don’t think he is what’s best for your country.  That’ll teach ’em.

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Last night I was talking to an acquaintance on the phone about my book progress among other things, and in a rather cautionary tone, she told me her experience with Bipolar Disorder. I must admit, I had a laugh over this.

One time at an event for one of the ministries she’s involved in at church, she struck up a conversation with a woman who was drinking can after can of Coca-Cola. This woman complained to my acquaintance that she couldn’t drop any weight, and she didn’t know why. My acquaintance, who is pure of heart and had no idea that this girl was even bipolar, told her to stop drinking cokes and start drinking a lot of water to flush out her system.

A few weeks later, my acquaintance gets a call from a church friend who says, “Hey, have you talked to Sue lately?” She says no and asks how she’s doing. Her friend on the phone goes, “Well, she’s been drinking tons of water and she flushed the Lithium out of her body and went kinda crazy, and now she’s in an Asylum!”

That’s one of those situations where it’s not funny, but it is, you know?
Impulse control and common sense, unfortunately, are not among our bipolar symptoms.

I always tell people that I like to talk about my disease as if it were a head cold. No big deal. I’m sick, I deal with it the best way I can, you can’t catch it (although after more than two years at my last job, I was beginning to think you really could “catch crazy), and I talk about it because I believe once you give something a voice, it stops being a taboo subject. This was also the idea behind the sexual abuse counseling I went to. The events of your childhood cease to be dirty secrets once they come to light and are faced head-on.

I think the same is true of mental illness. People are afraid what they don’t understand, but they’re never going TO understand until we come into the light (because, after all, Jesus calls us out of darkness anyway), and be honest about what ails us. And, yes, it means enduring jokes and stereotypes, but isn’t work to be acting strangely at times and not have anyone know why?

I know a lot of people don’t like to talk about ANY of their problems, and I can’t blame them. It’s a free country where we can say whatever we want, or opt not to, if that’s the better choice. However, I really do feel that if you’re sick of the lack of understanding, as I am, then you have a responsibility to educate people.

I take meds for diabetes, I take meds for my high blood pressure, and I take meds for my brain illness. That’s how I look at my life. And if someone has a problem with me because of it, even after having everything explained, than so be it. At least they’ve been told the truth.

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